Publications & resources

LAO brochures

Listed below are some of the brochures Legal Aid Ontario produces to better explain our services and operations.

Current brochures

Legal Aid Ontario Can Help brochure

Legal Aid Ontario can help

Legal Aid Ontario can help

Need legal help but cant afford it? We provide legal services for financially eligible, low-income Ontarians in the following areas: domestic violence, familylaw, immigration and refugee law, criminal law, and poverty law.


Financial eligibility for Legal Aid Ontario

Financial eligibility for Legal Aid Ontario

Financial eligibility for Legal Aid Ontario

Information about the eligibility threshold for LAO certificate services, duty counsel, and summary legal advice services. For the period of April 1, 2017 to March 31, 2018.


Finding the right legal aid lawyer

Finding the right legal aid lawyer

Finding the right legal aid lawyer

Learn how to find this important professional, what he or she can do for your case, and how to make the most of your relationship.


Download the brochure

Custody and access issues for immigrants and people at risk of deportation

Custody and access issues for immigrants and people at risk of deportation

This brochure provides important information for refugee claimants who are parents and separated from their partners.


Has children's aid contacted you?

Has children's aid contacted you?

Has children's aid contacted you?

An overview of what Legal Aid Ontario can do for you if children's aid has either taken your child into care or you are dealing with a child protection agency outside of the court process.


Why is it important to tell your lawyer you are Aboriginal?

Why is it important to tell your lawyer your are Aboriginal?

Why is it important to tell your lawyer you are Aboriginal?

As part of Legal Aid Ontarios (LAO) continued commitment to low-income Aboriginal individuals and disadvantaged communities, we have made services to Aboriginal clients a priority. We ask you as First Nation people, Mtis people and Inuit people to self-identify your Aboriginal ancestry.